Overview

Blue circles denote places of origin and brown circles destinations. 

Compiled by N. Karas and A. Tsilfidis for and on behalf of the Greek Genocide Resource Center.
December 2017

One of the primary methods used to bring about the destruction of Greek (Rum) communities in the Ottoman Empire during the Greek Genocide (1913-1923) was deportation. The list below documents 356 deportations conducted during this period in the region we know today as Turkey.

Deportations were an effective means to dispense with densely populated Greek communities both in Eastern Thrace and Asia Minor and were conducted before, during and after the First World War.  The death rates resulting from these deportations were often high, as measures were taken to maximize suffering. Deportees were deported without adequate provision for food and water and sometimes to places inhabited entirely by Muslims and forced to assimilate. Deportees were often maltreated and those who were unable to sustain the long distances died by the roadside.   

Deportations between 1913 and 1918 were authorized by the Ottoman Government under the direction of the Committee of Union and Progress party. During the period 1919-1922, deportations were conducted under the instruction of the Nationalist movement led by Mustafa Kemal (later Atatürk).  

For the purpose of this study, a deportation is considered a mass movement of a community or settlement by way of force. Communities that fled of their own free will are generally not included in the list. Communities that were deported to unknown locations (usually to the interior of Asia Minor) are also not included in the list since their destinations remain unknown. For deportations to Greece or Bulgaria where the exact destination was not mentioned, the closest destination point in those two countries was chosen. Those deported from western Asia Minor to Greece were usually deported to the closest island therefore the closest island was chosen as the destination.

The list is not complete and more deportations will be added in a subsequent volume. An interactive map of the deportations will be released in due course.

The following sources were used to document the deportations:  

 - Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919.

B - Mark H. Ward, The Deportations in Asia Minor, 1921-1922. London: Anglo-Hellenic League, 1922.
C - Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople: Press of the Patriarchate, 1920.
D - The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek.
E - The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek.
F - The Exodus: Testimonies from the Central Regions of Pontus. Volume C. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2013. In Greek
G - Carroll N. Brown Ph.D and Theodore P. Ion D.C.L. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey since the beginning of the European War. Oxford University Press, 1918.
H - U.S Department of State. 867.4016/123
I - Central Council of Pontus. Black Book: The Tragedy of Pontus. Athens 1922.
J - The New Near East, Feb 1923. Near East Relief, New York 1923.  

 

From To Month Year Source Page Comments
Hasköy Greece   1913 A 4 Some went to Bulgaria
Osmanli Bulgaria   1913 A 4 Some went to Greece from Bulgaria
Havsa Edirne October 1914 A 4 Some also went to Greece. Destination: Edirne (Gr: Adrianople)
Işıklı Enez April 1914 A 15 Then expelled to Greece. Işıklı (Gr: Arvanites)
Şehitler Enez April 1914 A 15 Then expelled to Greece. Şehitler (Gr: Kemerli)
Çelebi Enez April 1914 A 15 Then expelled to Greece. Çelebi (Gr: Tselepi)
Çanakçı Greece April 1914 A 31 Çanakçı (Gr: Tchanakdji)
Köseilyas Tekirdağ April 1914 A 32 From Tekirdağ deported to Greece. Köseilyas (Gr: Kioselez)
Alacabayır Balya and interior April 1914 A 57  
Gündoğdu Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Gündoğdu (Gr: Ala kilisse)
Şevketiye Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Şevketiye (Gr: Hadji-Baghoni)
İvrindi Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 İvrindi (Gr: Ivrendi)
Karaaydin Balya and interior April 1914 A 57  
Kocapınar Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Kocapınar (Gr: Kodja-Bounar)
Kubaş Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Kubaş (Gr: Koupassi)
Söğütköy Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Söğütköy (Gr: Souyout)
Taşkesiği Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Taşkesiği (Gr: Tach-Kisse)
Toybelen Balya and interior April 1914 A 57 Toybelen (Gr: Teipelen)
Yeniköy Balya and interior April 1914 A 57  
Adatepe Driven to Coast May 1914 A 62 Adatepe (Gr: Ada-Tope)
Aksaz Greece   1914 A 62  
Bayramiç Greece   1914 A 62  
Değirmencik Greece   1914 A 62  
Yenice Greece   1914 A 62 Yenice (Gr: Indje-Keuy)
İskenderköy Greece   1914 A 62  
Kemer Greece   1914 A 62 Kemer (Gr: Kamares)
Kösedere Greece   1914 A 62  
Küçükkuyu Greece   1914 A 62  
Yeşilyurt Greece   1914 A 62 Yeşilyurt (Gr: Megha-Tchepne)
Küçükçetmi Greece   1914 A 62 Küçükçetmi (Gr: Micro-Tchepne)
Intepe Greece September 1914 A 62 Intepe (Gr: Renkeuy)
Edremit Mytilene May 1914 A 79  
Burhaniye Mytilene   1914 A 79  
Kadıköy Dikili   1914 A 81 First to Kinik, then Bergama, then Dikili. Kadıköy (Gr: Christianohori)
Mersin Adana   1914 A 96  
Mersin Tarsus   1914 A 96  
Üsküp Marmara Ereğlisi September 1915 A 10 Also refer to Greek version of Black Book. Üsküp (Gr: Skopos)
Yenice Marmara Ereğlisi September 1915 A 10 They settled in Balikesir and Adapazar. Yenice (Gr: Skepastos). Destination: Marmara ereglisi (Gr: Heracleia)
Meriç Malkara September 1915 A 13 Meriç (Gr: Dogandza)
Eskiköy Malkara September 1915 A 13  
Kavakli Malkara September 1915 A 13  
Louli Malkara September 1915 A 13  
Paşayenice Malkara September 1915 A 13  
Çiftlikköy Malkara September 1915 A 13 Çiftlikköy (Gr: Tchiflikaki)
Çalıköy Malkara September 1915 A 13 Çalıköy (Gr: Tsali)
Yakupbey Malkara September 1915 A 13 Yakupbey (Gr: Yeaoup)
Demirköy Marmara Ereğlisi   1915 A 24 Demirköy (Gr: Samacovo). Then scattered over Thrace, İzmit and Erdek.
Hamdibey Marmara Ereğlisi   1915 A 24 Hamdibey (Gr: Troulias). Then scattered over Thrace, İzmit and Erdek.
Şarköy Marmara Ereğlisi   1915 A 24 Şarköy (Gr: Peristasis). Then scattered over Thrace, İzmit and Erdek.
Beğendik Marmara Ereğlisi   1915 A 24 Beğendik (Gr: St. Stefano). Then scattered over Thrace, İzmit and Erdek (Kyzik).
Marmara Ereğlisi Erdek   1915 A 24 2nd part of above deportation (Dep. #53).
Bahçeköy Istanbul April 1915 A 26  
Büyükdere Istanbul April 1915 A 26  
Rumelifeneri Yeniköy February 1915 A 27 Rumelifeneri (Gr: Fanaraki). Destination: Yeniköy (Gr: Nehori)
İstinye Istanbul July 1915 A 28 İstinye (Gr: Stenia)
Uzunköprü Malkara Sep-Oct 1915 A 33  
Kozköy Enez April 1915 A 35 Kozköy (Gr: Karya). Expelled via Enez.
Kırköy Dolu September 1915 A 35  
Kavakköy İzmit April 1915 A 37 Kavakköy (Gr: Examili)
Hacıköy Maltepe September 1915 A 36 Maltepe (Gr: Hadjiyri)
Hıdırköy Paşayiğit September 1915 A 36 Destination: Paşayiğit (Gr: Bessait)
Karacaali Yilanli   1915 A 37  
Mürefte İzmit   1915 A 40 Mürefte (Gr: Myriophito). Scattered around DIocese of Nicomedia (İzmit) and NIcaea (İznik).
Şarköy İzmit   1915 A 40 Şarköy (Gr: Peristasis). Scattered around DIocese of Nicomedia (İzmit) and NIcaea (İznik).
Şarköy İznik   1915 A 40 Şarköy (Gr: Peristasis)
Eriklice İzmit   1915 A 41 Eriklice (Gr: Heraclitsa). Scattered around DIocese of Nicomedia (İzmit) and NIcaea (İznik).
Eriklice İznik   1915 A 41 Eriklice (Gr: Heraclitsa)
İğdebağları İzmit   1915 A 41 İğdebağları (Gr: Loupidas). Scattered around DIocese of Nicomedia (İzmit) and NIcaea (İznik).
Yeniköy İzmit   1915 A 41 Yeniköy (Gr: Neohori)
Gelibolu Bandirma April 1915 A 42  
Gelibolu Tekirdağ April 1915 A 42  
Eceabat Bandirma April 1915 A 42 Eceabat (Gr: Madytos). Deported to Bandirma, Bergama and elsewhere.
Eceabat Bergama April 1915 A 42 Eceabat (Gr: Madytos)
Findikli Balikesir May 1915 A 43 Findikli (Gr: Anghelohori)
Bayırköy Balikesir May 1915 A 43 Bayırköy (Gr: Bairi)
Sütlüce Balikesir May 1915 A 43 Sütlüce (Gr: Galata)
Kavakli Balikesir May 1915 A 43  
Değirmendüzü Balikesir May 1915 A 43 Değirmendüzü (Gr: Pergazi)
Tayfurköy Balikesir May 1915 A 43 Tayfurköy (Gr: Tayfir)
Kestanelik Bandirma July 1915 A 44 Kastelli (Gr). From Bandirma to interior.
Çakılköy Bandirma July 1915 A 44 Çakılköy (Gr: Mihaniona). From Bandirma to interior.
Mahmutşevketpaşa Darica March 1915 A 48 Mahmutşevketpaşa (Gr: Arvanitohori) of the Beykoz district).
Armutlu Bursa June 1915 A 53  
Çınarcık Bursa June 1915 A 53 Çınarcık (Gr: Arvanitohori) of the Yalova district.
Yildiztepe Bursa June 1915 A 53 Yildiztepe (Gr: Mudanya)
İmralı Adası Bursa June 1915 A 53 İmralı Adası (Gr: Calolymos)
Çamlıca Bursa June 1915 A 53 Çamlıca (Gr: Tchamourdja)
Çeşnigir Bursa June 1915 A 53 Çeşnigir (Gr: Tchesneir)
Yalıçiftlik Bursa June 1915 A 53  
Kumyaka Dereköy June 1915 A 55 Kumyaka (Gr: Siyi)
Havutça Gönen June 1915 A 58 Havutça (Gr: Havoutsi)
Kestanelik Bandirma and interior July 1915 A 58 Kestanelik (Gr: Kastelli)
Kurşunlu Karacabey July 1915 A 58 Kurşunlu (Gr: Koursouli). Karacabey (Gr: Mihalitsi)
Çakılköy Bandirma and Interior July 1915 A 58 Çakılköy (Gr: Mihanionia)
Misakça Gönen June 1915 A 58 Misakça (Gr: Moussatza)
Asmalı Bandirma to interior June 1915 A 59 Asmalı (Gr: Afthoni)
Çınarlı Bandirma to interior June 1915 A 59 Çınarlı (Gr: Galini)
Topağaç Bandirma to interior June 1915 A 59 Topağaç (Gr: Klazaki)
Gündoğdu Bandirma to interior June 1915 A 59 Gündoğdu (Gr: Prastio)
Çanakkale Balikesir June 1915 A 63 Balikesir via Bandirma.
Gülbahçe Alaşehir June 1915 A 83  
Demircili (Upper & Lower) Alaşehir June 1915 A 83  
Kuşadası Alaşehir June 1915 A 83 Kuşadası (Gr: Nea Efesos)
Yağcılar Alaşehir June 1915 A 83  
Yeniköy Kartal April 1916 A 49 Deported to Kartal, then Adabazar, Eskişehir and Kütahya. Yeniköy (Gr: Neohori). Kartal (Gr: Hartalimi).
Kartal Adapazari April 1916 A  49 Kartal (Gr: Hartalimi)
Kartal Eskişehir April 1916 A  49 Kartal (Gr: Hartalimi)
Kartal Kütahya April 1916 A  49 Kartal (Gr: Hartalimi)
Fethiye Denizli   1916 A 93 Destination source see: The Exodus, Vol B, 485. Fethiye (Gr: Macri)
Günbatur Sivas   1916 A 101  
Gökçeler Sivas   1916 A 101 Gökçeler (Gr: Lower Tarsos)
Evren Sivas   1916 A 101 Evren (Gr: Mavrolith)
Uluşiran Sivas   1916 A 101  
Babuş Sivas   1916 A 101 Babuş (Gr: Papoutz)
Elmaçukuru Sivas   1916 A 101 Elmaçukuru (Gr: Parotzi)
Özen Sivas   1916 A 101 Özen (Gr: Sion)
Çağıl Sivas   1916 A 101 Çağıl (Gr: Tsaoul)
Dilekyolu Sivas   1916 A 101 Dilekyolu (Gr: Upper Tarsos)
Kazanpınar Sivas   1916 A 101 Kazanpınar (Gr: Zangar)
Çevrepınar Sivas   1916 A 101 Çevrepınar (Gr: Zimon)
Sinop Safranbolu July 1916 A 119 Also Kerze, Alacam, Ayadjik, Ayadin.
İnebolu Kastamonu June 1916 A 127 Includes settlements of Patheri, Atsidoo, Karadja, Askordassi.
Cide İnebolu June 1916 A 127 Cide (Gr: Djide)
İnebolu Kastamonu   1916 A 127  
Kastamonu Çerkeş   1916 A 127  
Ayvalik İzmir March 1917 A 67  
Ayvalik Bursa March 1917 A 67 Also deported to Karasi district.
Alacahan Sivas July 1917 A 99  
Kadıköy Sivas July 1917 A 99  
Kandil Sivas July 1917 A 99 Kandil (Gr: Kondylia)
Mendemeköyçukuru Sivas July 1917 A 99 Mendemeköyçukuru (Gr: Mentemeli)
Dolaylı Sivas July 1917 A 99 Dolaylai (Gr: Mondolas)
Biçer Sivas July 1917 A 99 Biçer (Gr: Pistour)
Refahiye Sivas July 1917 A 99  
Amasya Çorum Jan 1917 A 121  
Tirebolu Kastamonu March 1917 A 122 Tirebolu (Gr: Tripoli)
Giresun Kastamonu March 1917 A 122 Giresun (Gr: Kerasunda)
Sinop Kastamonu March 1917 A 122  
İnebolu Kastamonu March 1917 A 122  
Bafra Amasya December 1917 A 124  
Ordu Sivas September 1917 A 125 The following Greek settlements of Ordu also deported: Perşembe (Gr: Vona), Teke, Yasson, Fernek, Kaya-Bashi, Haidar, Alandjak, Oloukli, Artouli, Ova-Tchikouir, Andouz, Aghio-Antoni, Keuk-Omer, Tepe-Kaya, Tchiflik-Kiran, Kizil-Rouz, Kazandjilou, Elez-Keuy, Yeni-Bazar, Kizil-Ot, Ouzoun-Ali, Semen, Ahirlou, Pei-Alan
Ordu Kastamonu September 1917 A 125  
Ünye Zile July 1917 A 126 Scattered between Zile and Kastamonu
Harmanlı Bandirma to interior May 1918 A 59 Harmanli (Gr: Aloni)
Tuzla Bandirma to interior May 1918 A 59 Tuzla (Gr: Houlia)
Paşalimanı Bandirma to interior May 1918 A 59  
Balıklı Bandirma to interior May 1918 A 59 Balikli (Gr: Skoupia)
Poyrazlı Bandirma to interior May 1918 A 59 Poyrazli (Gr: Vori)
Karacasu Muğla July 1918 A 88 To Muğla and other Turkish villages. Karacasu (Gr: Karadja-sou)
Kızılcaova Muğla July 1918 A 88 To Muğla and other Turkish villages. Kizilcaova (Gr: Kokinohori)
Yenipazar Muğla July 1918 A 88 To Muğla and other Turkish villages
Tarsus Aleppo April 1918 A 96  
Bolayir Gelibolu   1912-1913 A 42  
Fatsa Amasya Nov -Feb 1916-1917 A 127  
Fatsa Tokat Nov-Feb 1916-1917 A 127  
Fatsa Zile Nov-Feb 1916-1917 A 127  
Fethiye Acibadem   1916-1918 A 93 Destination Source: Exodus, Vol B, 485. Fethiye (Gr: Macri)
Abalar Bulgaria   c1913 A 5 Abalar (Gr: Heimbeler)
Musulca Bulgaria   c1913 A 5 Musulca (Gr: Mosuldja)
Azatli Bulgaria   c1913 A 13  
Şerbettar Bulgaria   c1913 A 13 Şerbettar (Gr: Sarapalar)
Demirhanli Bulgaria   c1914 A 4 Then went to Greece
Avariz Bulgaria   c1914 A 4 Avariz (Gr: Havaris)
Kuleli Bulgaria   c1914 A 6  
Karakasim Bulgaria   c1913
A 13  
Yenimahalle Istanbul  Apr  1915 A 26  
Kireçburnu Istanbul  Apr 1915
A 26  
Kefeliköy Istanbul  Apr  1915 A 26  
Malkoç Doğanköy    c1913 A 34  
İbriktepe Altıntaş    c1915 A 36  
Küplü Köyü Greece    1915 A 53 Küplü Köyü (Gr: Kiouplia)
Alibey Adasi Bursa    1917 A 70 Alibey Adasi (Gr: Moskhonisi)
Alibey Adasi İzmir    1917 A   Alibey Adasi (Gr: Moskhonisi)
Dereköy Mitylene    1914 A 79  
Karaağaç Mytilene    1914 A 79 Karaağaç (Gr: Karagatchi)
İnönü Fatsa    c1916 A 99 Located north west of Kizik. Approximate location of İnönü.
Kizik Fatsa    c1916 A 99  
Pazarbeleni (Gr) Fatsa    c1916 A 99  
Yolağzı Şebinkarahisar    c1916 A 105  
Konya Bitlis May 1921 B 6,8,11  
Kayseri Bitlis May 1921 B 6  
Amasya Bitlis May 1921 B 6,10  
Bilecik Elâzığ May 1921 B 6-7  
Eskişehir Elâzığ June 1921 B 6,7,11  
Kütahya Elâzığ June 1921 B 6,7,11  
Sivrihisar Elâzığ June 1921 B 7  
Akşehir Elâzığ July 1921 B 8  
Afyonkarahisar Elâzığ July 1921 B 8  
Karaman Elâzığ July 1921 B 8  
Ereğli Elâzığ July 1921 B 8  
Haymana Elâzığ July 1921 B 8  
Ordu Elâzığ July 1921 B 9,10,14  
Giresun Elâzığ July 1921 B 9,10  
Zara Elâzığ August 1921 B 9  
Tepecik Elâzığ August 1921 B 10  
Havza Elâzığ August 1921 B 10  
Merzifon Elâzığ August 1921 B 10  
Samsun Elâzığ Sep 1921 B 11  
Vezirköprü Elâzığ Sep 1921 B 11  
Niğde Elâzığ Sep 1921 B 11  
Sivas Elâzığ Nov 1921 B 13,14  
Isparta Elâzığ Dec 1921 B 14  
Burdur Elâzığ Dec 1921 B 14  
Ödemiş Elâzığ Dec 1921 B 14  
Malatya Elâzığ Feb 1922 B 15  
Elâzığ Bitlis   1921-1922 B 6-15 Numerous convoys
Elâzığ Diyarbakir May-Oct 1921 B 6.12 Numerous convoys
Eskişehir Ankara Aug 1919 C 78 See also Exodus Volume B. p399
Kütahya Ankara Aug 1919 C 83  
Kütahya Eskişehir Aug 1919 C 83  
Aydin Nazilli June 1919 C 100  
Aydin Denizli June 1919 C 100  
İzmir Aleppo Aug 1922 D 11-19 Prisoners of war.
Bıyıklı Niğde Apr 1922 D 161-164  
Yiambey Niğde Easter 1922 D 168-170 Approximate location of Yiambey.
Nazilli Talas June 1919 D 173-175  
Bağarası Niğde Easter 1922 D 191-193  
Güllük Kayseri June 1919 D 207-209  
Muğla Kayseri August 1919 D 211-212  
Tatsa Mugla August 1919 D 212 Tatsa was located in the Marmara region. Approximate location on map.
Bodrum Sivas   c1919-1920 D 212  
Lapseki Afyonkarahisar   c1914 D 255  
Biga Bandirma Sep 1922 D   Men only
Balikesir Bandirma   c1919 D 261-277  
Kurşunlu Gürsu   1915 D 323 Gürsu (Gr: Susurluk)
Şile Sivrihisar   c1917 D 340-341  
Nazilli Güzelyurt   c1920 E 9  
Denizli Güzelyurt   c1920 E 9  
İzmir Kayseri   c1919 E 36  
Isparta Kayseri   c1919 E 36  
Nazilli Kayseri   c1919 E 36  
Denizli Kayseri   c1919 E 36  
Kayseri Sivas   c1919 E 36 Children deported
Denizli Germir   1919-1920 E 85  
Nazilli Germir   1919-1920 E 85  
Eğirdir Germir   1919-1920 E 85  
Niš Germir   1919-1920 E 85  
Isparta Germir   1919-1920 E 85  
Burdur Germir   1919-1920 E 85  
Erzincan Germir   c1919 E 85  
Nazilli Gesi   c1922 E 94 Gesi (Gr: Kesi)
Denizli Gesi   c1922 E 94  
Darsiyak Sivas   1919 E 120 Darisyak (Gr: Taksiarchi)
Darsiyak Erzurum   1919 E 120 Darisyak (Gr: Taksiarchi)
Darsiyak Kayseri   1919 E 120 Darsiyak (Gr: Taksiarchi)
Isparta Özvatan   1920 E 129 Özvatan (Gr: Tsouchour)
Nazilli Özvatan   1920 E 129 Özvatan (Gr: Tsouchour)
Burdur Özvatan   1920 E 129 Özvatan (Gr: Tsouchour)
Denizli Özvatan   1920 E 129 Özvatan (Gr: Tsouchour)
Bursa Nevşehir   1922 E 139 Nevşehir(Gr: Neapoli)
Aydin Nevşehir   1922 E 139 Nevşehir(Gr: Neapoli)
İzmir Kaymakli   c1922 E 146 Kaymakli (Gr: Anakou)
Isparta Özlüce   1919-1922 E 172 Özlüce (Gr: Silata)
Burdur Özlüce   1919-1922 E 172 Özlüce (Gr: Silata)
Nazilli Özlüce   1919-1922 E 172 Özlüce (Gr: Silata)
Denizli Özlüce   1919-1922 E 172 Özlüce (Gr: Silata)
Özlüce Nevşehir   1922 E 172 Özlüce (Gr: Silata). Nevşehir(Gr: Neapoli)
Epes Taşçı   1920 E 332 Epes or Hapes (Gr) was the name of a region. Approximate location of Epes. Taşçı (Gr: Tastsi)
Nazilli Sille Subaşı   c1919-1921 E 351 Sille Subaşı (Gr: Silli)
Konya Diyarbakir Dec 1921 E 352  
Akşehir Bitlis Summer 1921 E 357-358 Men only.
Bafra Sivas   1922 E 358  
Denizli SIvas   1922 E 358  
Havza Sivas   1922 E 358  
Samsun Sivas   1922 E 358  
Emirdağ Aleppo   1922 E 396 Destination Syria. Emirdağ (Azîziyye).
Gökçeoğlu Ankara Aug 1920 E 399  
Denizli Eğirdir   1919-1922 E 406 Men only.
Sarayköy Niğde   1920 E 413-415  
Honaz Aksaray Summer 1919 E 417-418  
Aksaray Kayseri   1919-1920 E 417-418 Men only. Originally from Honaz.
Aksaray Güzelyurt   1919-1920 E 417-418 Women/children. Originally from Honaz. Güzelyurt (Gelveri).
Simav Ankara   1920 E 422  
Isparta Aksaray   1919-1922 E 447 Men only.
Nis Pozanti   1914 E 452 Men only.
Nis Biga   1914 E 452 Men only.
Aydin Niš   1919 E 452  
Nis Bitlis   1919 E 452 Men 14 years and older.
Barla İncesu   c1919-1921 E 454-455  
İncesu Erzurum Nov 1921 E 455 Men from Barla.
İncesu Kars Nov 1921 E 455 Men from Barla
Burdur Kayseri   1922 E 460 Men only.
Isparta Burdur   1922 E 460 Women/children deported.
Uluborlu Deliktaş   1921 E 463-464  
Dinar Koçhisar   1920 E 467 Men only.
Kayaköy Denizli   1916 E 485 Kayaköy (Gr: Levissi)
Kayaköy Niğde Spring 1920 E 485 Men only. Kayaköy (Gr: Levissi)
Kayaköy Denizli   c1922 E 487 Children only. Kayaköy (Gr: Levissi)
Eşen Ergani Autumn 1919 E 491-493 Eşen (Gr: Kestep)
Göcek Diyarbakir   1920 E 494 Göcek (Gr: Kioutzeki)
Belediyesi Erzincan June 1920 E 495 Belediyesi (Gr: Peltziazi)
Kumluca Erzincan   1921 E 511-512  
Arkarasou (Gr) Kayseri   1919 E 527 Men only.
Arkarasou (Gr) Diyarbakir   1919 E 527 Men only.
Mut Diyarbakir   1920 E 528 Men only.
Bahche (Gr) Erzurum   1920 E 530 Men only. Approximate location of Bahche.
Taşucu Kayseri   c1920 E 534 Men only.
Taşucu Mut   1919 E 534 Men only.
Merzifon Sivas   c1919-1922 F 43 Men only.
Merzifon Tokat   c1919-1922 F 43 Men only.
Merzifon Erzurum   c1919-1922 F 43 Men only.
Merzifon Gümüş Maden   c1919-1922 F 44  
Hodjas (Gr) Aleppo Jun 1921 F 77 Approximate location of Hodjas.
Karatzoren (Gr) Aeppo Summer 1921 F 99 Approximate location of Karatzoren.
Kovanits (Gr) Bitlis June 1921 F 102 Approximate location of Kovanits.
Kiosuruf (Gr) Diyarbakir   1920 F 104-105 Approximate location of Kiosuruf.
Şerifali Malatya June 1921 F 108-109  
Trabzon Erzurum   c1919-1922 F 141  
Karaağaç Diyarbakir June 1921 F 144 Approximate locaton of Karaağaç (Gr: Karaagatch Punar).
Tsamlutsa (Gr) Diyarbakir   c1919-1922 F 159-160 Approximate locaton of Tsamlutsa.
Amasya Malatya   1920 F 170  
Çiğdemlik Diyarbakir   1920 F 171-172 Çiğdemlik (Gr: Zaana).
Findikli Diyarbakir July 1920 F 178  
Yiazir (Gr) Diyarbakir Easter 1921 F 196 Approximate location of Findikli.
Gölcük Sivas October 1920 F 198  
Endikpınar Kangal Jan 1922 F 200-201  
Demirtaş Malatya   c1920 F 204 Demirtaş (Gr: Iskili).
Kelemuts (Gr) Diyarbakir   c1920 F 207 Approximate location of Kelemuts.
Kioseli (Gr) Diyarbakir   c1920 F 210 Approximate location of Kioseli.
Tazou (Gr) Erzurum   c1919-1922 F 211 Approximate location of Tazou.
Tekkes (Gr) Sivas   c1921 F 213 Approximate location of Tekkes.
Tokat Malatya   1920 F 252  
Niksar Adiyaman   c1920 F 269  
Argoslou (Gr) Malatya Summer 1921 F 272 Approximate location of Argoslou.
Argoslou (Gr) Zara April 1922 F 275 Approximate location of Argoslou.
Sulugöl Zara   c1922 F 275  
Erestizi (Gr) Zara   c1922 F 275 Approximate location of Erestizi.
Sutluk (Gr) Zara   c1922 F 275 Approximate location of Sutluk.
Aydoğmuş Diyarbakir June 1921 F 286-287 Approximate location of Aydoğmuş (Gr: Endirek)
Erestizi (Gr) Malatya   1921 F 291 Approximate location of Erestizi.
Kilavuz (Gr) Sivas Jan 1921 F 301 Approximate location of Kilavuz.
Kiliyeris (Gr) Bitlis June 1921 F 304 Approximate locationof Kiliyeris.
Sorhun (Gr) Malatya June 1921 F 308 Approximate location of Sorhun.
Sulugöl Zara June 1921 F 310  
Tahtalı Diyarbakir May 1921 F 315-316  
Hanyeri Kangal October 1921 F 328-329  
Altinoluk Bitlis October 1919 F 353 Approximate location of Altinoluk (Gr: Altinoglu ciftlik).
Senia (Gr) Adiyaman   1921 F 360 Approximate location of Senia.
Belen Tokat   1916 F 600 Belen (Gr: Kato Pelen)
Belen Erzincan   1921 F 600 Men only. Belen (Gr: Kato Pelen)
Pintsanton (Gr) Sivas   1916 F 609 Approximate location of Pintsanton.
Maden Bucağı Sivas Feb 1916 F 621 Maden Bucağı (Gr: Halvamaden)
Katrak (Gr) Sivas Feb 1916 F 621 Approximate location (Katrak located close to Bayburt).
Koskiri (Gr) Sivas Feb 1916 F 621 Approximate location (Koskiri located close to Bayburt).
Samsun Çorum Jan 1917 G 49-50  
Samsun Sivas Jan-Feb 1917 G 51  
Samsun Ankara Province Jan-Feb 1917 G 51  
Bafra Kastamonu Province   C1916-1917 G 52  
Bafra Ankara Province   C1916-1917 G 53  
Kemerburgaz İznik June 1915 G 41 Kemerburgaz (Gr: Pyrgos)
Ekinlik Adasi Susurluk June 1915 G 41-42 Ekinlik Adasi (Gr: Koutali)
Marmara Adasi Bandirma June 1915 G 42 Then deported to different parts of interior. Marmara Adasi (Gr: Prokonisos)
Gelibolu Balikesir district April 1915 H   Henry Morgenthau Snr. to Secretary of State
Alaçam Osmancık   c1921 I 22  
İzmir Taurus Mountains   1922/1923 J 12-13 1,000 deportees, 95% women and children. Originally 3,000.

List and map compiled by the Greek Genocide Resource Center

 

The Greek Genocide involved the persecution of native Greeks living in the Ottoman Empire. While deportation to the arid interior of Turkey was the more effective way to liquidate Greek communities en masse, small and large-scale massacres were also committed. Below is a list of known massacres perpetrated during the Greek Genocide.  An interactive map of the massacres can be viewed here.

A massacre can be generally considered as being an indiscriminate and brutal killing of many people. In order to better define the term 'many people' we have chosen 20 as being the minimum number of people killed in order for a mass killing to qualify as a massacre, unless the massacre involved children, notables, wealthy citizens or religious clergy.  

The following sources were used to compile the list:  

- Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. 

- Carroll N. Brown Ph.D and Theodore P. Ion D.C.L. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey since the beginning of the European War. Oxford University Press, New York 1918. 

- Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople: Press of the Patriarchate, 1920. 

- The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. 

- The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. 

- The Exodus: Testimonies from the Central Regions of Pontus. Volume C. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2013. In Greek.  

- Yeghiayan, Vartkes. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. 

- Faltaits, K. The Genocide of the Greeks in Turkey: Survivor Testimonies from the Nicomedia (Izmit) Massacres of 1902-1921. Cosmos 2016

- Puaux, René. La Mort de Smyrne. Édition de la revue des Balkans. Paris 1922.  

- Puaux, René. Les derniers jours de Smyrne. Paris 1923. 

- Central Council of Pontus. Black Book: The Tragedy of Pontus. Athens 1922. 

 

LIST OF MASSACRES 

1913

Kiscasalih

Kiscasalih (Mega Zaloufi): 130 inhabitants killed when Ottoman forces reoccupied the town.  

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p.13. 

 

Gönence

July: The Ottoman Army entered Gönence (Καλύβια) and looted all the houses and killed all the Christians they met. The village and neighborhood was full of corpses of men, women and children.

Source: ALLEGED TURKISH ATROCITIES. (1913, September 13). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 6. Retrieved November 28, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21011262

 

Malkara

July: Turkish soldiers massacre 300 Greeks at a rich monastery. Eighteen Greek villages also wiped out.

Source: Turks Massacre Greeks in Thrace. The New York Times, 28 July 1913, p. 3.

 

1914

Seyrek 

May: The village, located in the district of Menemen, was besieged by thousands of armed Turks before it was set fire to and its inhabitants massacred. Women and children were literally butchered.  

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. pp. 79-80. 

 

Didymoteicho 

May: Massacre of women and children. Those trying to escape the massacre crossed the Maritsa (Meriç) River and drowned after being shot at. 

Source: SLAUGHTER OF GREEKS. (1914, May 19). The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), p. 5. 

 

Foça 

June: Armed irregulars stormed the town of Foça (Gr: Phocaea). With the assistance of Ottoman officials approximately 100 Greeks including priests and children were massacred. The town was then looted. The remainder fled. 

Sources: GREEKS MASSACRED (1914, June 17). The Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1923), p. 1 (4 P.M. EDITION). Retrieved November 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article204671244 

- Bjørnlund, M. Cited from The Genocide of the Ottoman Greeks. Aristide Caratzas, 2012, pp153-154. 

 

Uzunada 

July: Turkish regular troups drive 16 Greeks to the town square where they are butchered. Two girls (14 and 17 y.o)  successively violated by 25 soldiers). 

Sources: GREEKS MASSACRED. (1914, July 22). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 6. Retrieved September 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article175971928  

-Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p 86. 

 

Erzurum 

December: Greeks and Armenians hanged without trial. Their corpses suspended from lamp posts for weeks. Turks passing by spat on their bodies and compelled the Christians to do likewise.  

Source: Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate, 15 Dec 1914, p.5. 

 

Ayvalik 

December: Greeks massacred at Ayvalik. Houses pillaged and shops burned. 

Source: The Washington herald. (Washington, D.C.), 17 Dec. 1914. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1914-12-17/ed-1/seq-1/> 

 

1915

Burhaniye

March: 60 Christian families massacred at Burhaniye (Gr: Kemeri).  

Source: The Daytona daily news. (Daytona, Fla.), 15 March 1915. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93063916/1915-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/> 

 

Ayvalik

March: Massacre of 40 Greeks. 

Source: The Daytona Daily News. (Daytona, Fla.), 15 March 1915. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93063916/1915-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/> 

 

Gümüshane

April: 4,000 Greeks from the region escaped from Turkish military authorities and sought refuge in the forests of Gümüshane . Hard pressed by hunger, some managed to flee towards Russia while the remainder were caught, tortured then massacred, their bodies thrown into the Pyxites River.  

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p109.  

 

Bodrum 

June:  18 inhabitants and one girl aged 16 slaughtered. 

Source: Carroll N. Brown Ph.D and Theodore P. Ion D.C.L. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey Since the Beginning of the European War. Oxford University Press, 1918, p.30. 

 

Kiosteniou 

July: 18 Greeks butchered at Kiosteniou. 

Source: Carroll N. Brown Ph.D and Theodore P. Ion D.C.L. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey Since the Beginning of the European War. Oxford University Press, 1918, p.33. 

 

İzmit 

September: Turks set fire to İzmit and conduct a general massacre of the population. 

Source: TURKISH MASSACRE. (1915, September 6). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 7. Retrieved October 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article20089650  

 

Gölcük 

November: The village was surrounded by soldiers and gendarmes who opened fire causing villagers to flee to the mountains. They then set fire to the village. As villagers fled in terror, 30 were shot and killed at point blank range. 

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p.40. 

 

1916

Edirne 

April: Massacre of 400 Greeks. 

Source: GREEK MASSACRES. (1916, April 27). The Evening Telegraph (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1901 - 1921), p. 5. Retrieved October 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article212815360 

 

İzmir 

April: Massacre of 200 Greeks in the İzmir (Gr: Smyrna) district. 

Source: MASSACRE OF GREEKS. (1916, April 22). Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), p. 7. Retrieved October 24, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article152760190  

 

Maçka 

April: The Vazelon Monastery in Maçka was the sight of a massacre of 487 people, mostly women and children who had been hiding in the forest. They were captured, violated within the monastery, and then massacred. Men were also murdered. The church was then burnt and destroyed, its furniture carried away, its bibles and archives burnt to cinders. 

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p. 111. 

 

Trabzon 

April: Hundreds of Greeks and Armenians massacred in the Christian quarter of Trabzon. 

Source: MASSACRE OF CHRISTIANS BEFORE EVACUATION OF TREBIZOND (1916, April 21). Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), p. 5. Retrieved November 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124874666  

 

1917

Bafra 

October: After distributing arms to Turkish peasants, Greeks, including children were massacred. 

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p. 124. 

 

1918

Rize 

Turkish bands attacked Rize and massacred some of the population. Schools, churches and houses were plundered and demolished. Residents were compelled to emigrate to Russia. Out of 2,000 people only 4 remained.    

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. Persecution of the Greeks in Turkey 1914-1918. The Hesperia Press, London 1919. p. 113. 

 

1919

Buca 

March: Reports of many murders and robberies by bands of Turks against Greeks in the region. The bodies of 50 Greeks found decapitated and partially burned. 

Source: Great Unrest Reported Over Disposition of Smyrna Region, The New York Times, 21 March 1919. Web. <http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9F0DE3DC1331E433A25752C2A9659C946896D6CF>  

 

Nazilli 

June: Massacre of several Greek families. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.10. Web. 24 Oct. 2017. <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Atça 

June: 47 Greeks massacred and the priest burned alive. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.22. Web. 24 Oct. 2017. <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Köşk 

June: 47 people massacred in Köşk, including a doctor and the priest, who was first blinded and had his nose and ears cut off. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.22. Web. 24 Oct. 2017. <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Umurlu 

June: More than 90 Greeks massacred at Umurlu and 70 bodies found. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.22. Web. 24 Oct. 2017. <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Karapelit 

June: All the young children of the village were taken to a place close to the Black Sea near the village Hocaali. They were then placed in a circle and shot while musical instruments were played loudly.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.293.  

 

Aydin 

June: Massacre of approx. 1,500-2,000 Greeks by Kemalist forces in June 1919. Hundreds of bodies found burnt alive, some after having been raped, and bodies found thrown into wells. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. Document 3, No 33, p.12. Web. 20/07/2017. <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Çantaköy

August: Turkish gendarmes and bandits surround Greek town of Çantaköy (Gr: Tsento) and massacre Greeks.  

Source: Turks Massacre Greeks, Alexandria Gazette, 12 Aug 1919, p.3.   

 

Manisa 

c1919: 115 Greeks massacred by Turkish gangs in the Manisa region. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.24. Web. 24 Oct. 2017.  <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Alaşehir 

c1919: 47 murders reported in Alaşehir and neighboring regions. 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.26. Web. 24 Oct. 2017.  <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Halitpaşa 

Mass slaughter of Greeks at Halitpaşa (Gr: Papazli). 

Source: Documents of the Inter-Allied Commission of Inquiry into the Greek Occupation of Smyrna and Adjoining Territories. p.24. Web. 24 Oct. 2017.  <http://www.ataa.org/reference/iacom.pdf> 

 

Ilgin 

7-8 wealthy elected Greek notables were hanged by Turkish authorities.   

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.363. 

 

Kaklik 

Summer: 15 wealthy Greek men from Honaz are shot at the gorge of Kaklik deresi and their valuables taken.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.417.  

 

Yenipazar 

70 Greeks massacred and thrown in the Meander river.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.177. 

 

Ankara 

Late 1919 or 1920: Notables and elders taken to a nearby location and massacred.   

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.377. 

 

1920

Emirdağ 

c1920: 50 Greeks found massacred. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.395.  

 

Tekirdağ 

March: Large number of Greeks massacred at Tekirdağ. 

Source: Report Turks Killed Many at Rodosto, The New York Times, 4 March 1920. Web. <http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9F0CE0DA103BEE32A25757C0A9659C946195D6CF> 

 

Sarköy 

March: Massacre of Greeks and Armenians at Sarköy (or Şar, also spelt Shahr). 

Source: Yeghiayan, V.  British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.139. 

 

Karakavuz

May: The Greek village was surrounded, plundered and all inhabitants massacred except very few. 

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople Press of the Patriarchate, 1920, p.142.  

 

Findikli 

June: Kemalists surrounded the four Greek villages of Findikli (Gr: Foundouklia). The men were shut up in a church and ordered to come out in fives and were shot. Of the population of 3,400, 400 men and 30 women were massacred.  

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.167. 

 -Faltaits, K.  The Genocide of the Greeks in Turkey: Survivor Testimonies from the Nicomedia(Izmit) Massacres of 1920-1921. Cosmos 2016, pp. 71-74.  

 

Fulacik 

June: Nationalist Kemalist forces accompanied by the gendarmerie entered the village and proceeded to loot and burn houses and massacre its inhabitants. Three hundred men including boys as young as 14 were locked in the village church before it was doused with petrol and set alight.  

Source: Faltaits, K. The Genocide of the Greeks in Turkey: Survivor Testimonies from the Nicomedia(Izmit) Massacres of 1902-1921. Cosmos 2016, pp. 43-51. 

 

Mersin 

Around June: Greeks and Armenians living in the districts near Mersin were massacred.  

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.152. 

 

Yukariyapici 

June: 22 Greek men massacred at Yukariyapici (Ano Neochori). 

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople Press of the Patriarchate 1920, p.116. 

 

Nazilli 

June: Approximately 162 Greeks were either massacred or burned to death in their homes when Kemalist soldiers and the gendarmerie (police) put fire to the Greek quarter of Nazilli. 

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople Press of the Patriarchate 1920, p.103. 

 

Erbaa 

June: Vast massacre of the Greek male population of Erbaa under the command of Kemalist Military Commander Topal Osman. All men aged between 15-70 years were gathered at the home of notable Greek Anastas efendi, or the Armenian church, and were executed. Bodies were disposed of in the forest. Only those hiding in the mountains escaped the massacre.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Central Regions of Pontus. Volume C. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2013. In Greek. p.194, 196 and 206.  

 

Geyve 

July: Kemalist Nationalist forces massacre hundreds of Greeks and Armenians at Geyve.  

Source: TURKISH ATROCITIES. (1920, July 31). The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939), p. 5. Retrieved October 24, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article127337896 

 

Simav

July: Kemalist forces enter Simav and 15 Greek notables are massacred. 240 inhabitants then deported to Kütahya, but 5 minutes from Simav all were massacred except 25 who managed to escape. 

Sources: - Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople Press of the Patriarchate, 1920, p.111-112.  

- The Exodus: Testimonies from the regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor, Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek, p.421. 

 

Yozgat

July: Kemalist forces massacred 60 Greeks and 20 Armenians at Yozgat. Some were crucified. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.161. 

 

Sernits 

Summer: 18 Greek men massacred.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Central Regions of Pontus. Volume C. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2013. In Greek. p.151. 

 

İznik 

August: Turkish irregulars massacred approx. 600 Greeks of İznik (Gr: Nicaea). Their slaughtered bodies were later found burnt out in a cave just outside the town. The town's church was also destroyed, not before women were raped on the altar.   

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.172. 

 

Osmaneli 

August: Wholesale massacre. Out of 800 Greeks very few survived. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.299.   

 

Bolu 

August: Kurds surround the Armenian quarter where there were 20 Greek families. They pillaged the houses, then shut the men up in the Armenian church, killed the women and then set fire to the church and the whole town. Very few survived. 80 Greeks were massacred. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.167. 

 

Oçoglu 

September: Kemalist army entered Oçoglu near Yozgat and gathered all villagers into the church. They then raped all women and girls in the presence of their fathers, husbands and brothers and massacred all of them, 280 in number.  

Source: Ecumenical Patriarchate, Constantinople. The Black Book of the Sufferings of the Greek People in Turkey from the Armistice to the end of 1920. Constantinople Press of the Patriarchate, 1920, p.75.  

 

Geyve 

October: About 30 Christians, mostly Greeks massacred by Nationalists. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.175. 

 

Saraçli 

At Saraçli (Gr: Houdi) women and girls were locked in a church where those who weren't killed were raped. Women and children were tied up and shot. Men were massacred en masse 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.327.  

 

Ortaköy 

The town of some 10,000 Greeks was completely burnt to the ground in 1920. The majority of the 10,000 Greeks were massacred. Atrocities included rape, be-headings as well as massacre via the use of knives and hatchets. 

Source: Faltaits, K. The Genocide of the Greeks in Turkey: Survivor Testimonies from the Nicomedia(Izmit) Massacres of 1920-1921. Cosmos 2016, pp. 91-98. 

 

Vezirköprü 

October: Burning of villages and massacre of inhabitants. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.179. 

 

Hacibey 

c1920: Wholesale massacre under the command of Kemalist Military Commander Topal Osman. Adults were locked up in barns churches and schools and burned alive. Children were unclothed then thrown in wells and rocks thrown over them. Women were taken to a cliff overlooking a river, were undressed then with knives, axes and bullets attacked and thrown into the river. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Central Regions of Pontus. Volume C. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2013. In Greek. p.221.  

 

Toraman 

c1920-1921: 32 Greek men including a priest, from nearby Upper Ovacik and Kavuklu were burned by Kemalist regulars. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.273.  

 

1921

Kontzes 

February: Attacked by nationalist Kemalist forces under the command of Cemal (Djemal) of Iznik. Inhabitants slaughtered while homes were burnt to the ground. 

Source: K. Faltaits. The Genocide of the Greeks in Turkey: Survivor Testimonies from the Nicomedia (Izmit) Massacres of 1920-1921. Cosmos 2016, pp.75-80. 

 

Kayseri 

March: Kemalist forces commit 3 day massacre of Christians. 

Source: TERRIBLE MASSACRES (1921, March 22). The Bathurst Times (NSW : 1909 - 1925), p. 2. Retrieved October 24, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111536870  

 

Niksar 

May: Massacre of Greeks at Niksar under the command of Kemalist Military Commander Topal Osman.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Central Regions of Pontus. Volume C. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2013. In Greek. p.272, 274, 289.  

 

Alaçam 

May: The Turks imprisoned the Christian male population above the age of 12 then massacred them. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.236. 

 

Samsun 

June: Massacres reported at Samsun where the streets are strewn with bodies of Greeks.  

Source: GREEKS AND TURKS. (1921, June 6). Tweed Daily (Murwillumbah, NSW : 1914 - 1949), p. 3. Retrieved October 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article190908100 

 

Merzifon 

July: The Mayor of Giresun, the notorious Topal Osman, and his band of 'cut-throats' entered Merzifon and massacred approximately 1,000 Greeks and Armenians in a massacre that lasted 4 days. The bodies were later dumped and buried in pits in the Christian cemetery.  

Source: Shenk, R. America's Black Sea Fleet. Naval Institute Press 2012, pp. 103-105.   

 

Adaköy 

July: Men, women and children were herded into houses which were then set on fire. All those who escaped were shot. 600 massacred. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.211-212. 

 

Samsun 

July: One village burned by Nationalists and 82 bodies of men, women and children found floating in the Kizil Irmak River. 

Source: Turks Massacre 82 Greeks, New Mexico state record. (Santa Fe, N.M.), 22 July 1921. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93061701/1921-07-22/ed-1/seq-2/> 

 

Kartepe 

The town was first looted on the 15th of May 1920, but on the 25th of March 1921, Kemalist forces returned and continued the looting and massacred the population. 

Source: Faltaits, K. The Genocide of the Greeks in Turkey: Survivor Testimonies from the Nicomedia(Izmit) Massacres of 1920-1921. Cosmos 2016, pp. 65-69. 

 

Kavak 

August: 1,300 Greeks shot in two and a half hours at Kavak.   

Source: Rendel, W. British Documents on Foreign Affairs: Reports and Papers from the Foreign Office Confidential Print. Part II, Series B, Volume 3. University Publications of America, 1985, p.85. 

 

Çakalli 

c1921: Women and children locked up in houses of the village and  burnt alive. 

Source: Central Council of Pontus. Black Book: The Tragedy of Pontus. Athens 1922. p.20. 

 

Kocadağ

August: Kemalists set fire to Greek villages. Nearly 3,000 inhabitants burned alive in flaming houses they were prevented from escaping. 

Source: TURKS MASSACRE CHRISTIANS. (1921, August 27). The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1931), p. 13. Retrieved October 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article127128042  

 

Bafra 

August: Massacre of 2,000 within 8 days. 

Source: Yeghiayan, V. British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.222.  

 

Kurtsuyu 

September: Kurtuyu and neighbouring Christian villages pillaged then burned. Many old men and women burnt alive.  

Source: Yeghiayan, V.  British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.227.  

 

Samsun 

September: Turks kill 466 Greek refugees who were in a convoy that was destined for the coast. 

Source: TURKS MASSACRE REFUGEES. (1921, September 8). Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved October 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95377253  

 

Bafra 

October: Greek villages burnt, men massacred, men and women deported in Bafra district.  

Source: GREEKS MASSACRED. (1921, October 19). Daily Standard (Brisbane, Qld. : 1912 - 1936), p. 4 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved October 24, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article184952873  

 

Samsun 

November: 300 Greeks massacred at Samsun. 

Source: MASSACRE OF GREEKS. (1921, November 26). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved October 24, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195339049  

 

1922

Samsun 

April: Massacre of Christians at Samsun. Nationalists surrounded and set fire to the Greek quarters, shooting at those who fled.  

Source: Massacre of Greeks by Turks, The Maui news. (Wailuku, Maui, H.I.), 18 April 1922. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014689/1922-04-18/ed-1/seq-1/>   

 

Kavak 

June: 1,300 Christian women and children taken to the interior of Turkey and all massacred. 

Source: MASSACRE OF CHILDREN (1922, June 15). Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), p. 5. Retrieved October 24, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article153325764  

 

Akçay 

August/September: Greeks from Edremit who were waiting at Akçay for transport out of Turkey were taken to a gorge near Araplar and killed. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek., p.229. 

 

İzmir 

On the 13th of September 1922, nationalist Kemalist forces entered the city, set fire to it, and proceeded to massacre its Greek and Armenian population. Estimates range from 10,000 to 100,000 killed. 

Sources: Numerous accounts and news reports.  

 

Çakallar 

September:  600 mine workers from the nearby Balya mines are slaughtered with the strike of a bayonet beside trenches that were prepared the day prior. The corpses were then set on fire and Kemalist soldiers remained at the scene for 2 or 3 days until they were completely burned. 

Source: Puaux, René. Les derniers jours de Smyrne. Paris 1923, pp.43-44. 

 

Urla 

September: A wholesale massacre of Greeks. Females raped and abducted.  

Source: Puaux, René. Les derniers jours de Smyrne. Paris 1923, pp.35-41.

 

Güre 

September: Massacre of Greeks who were awaiting for ships to exit Turkey.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.236. 

 

Dereköy 

September: Massacre of Greeks who were ordered to a gorge at nearby Havran and were all shot.   

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.238. 

 

Çoruk 

September: All 200 residents were massacred. The villagers were taken to a place called Valanithia just past Frengioy where they were all shot.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.245. 

 

Biga 

September: A wholesale massacre of Greeks at nearby Yenice (or Intzekioy) that started one evening and ended the following morning.   

Source:The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.257. 

 

Havran 

September: Sizeable number of Greeks from Havran (Grk: Freneli) escaped to nearby Akçay, near Edremit (see Akçay 1922) where a large proportion of them were killed en masse. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.247.  

 

Balikesir 

September: Wholesale massacre of Greeks. Hundreds of girls abducted.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.263.  

 

Elpizli 

September: Massacre of Greeks. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. P.338. 

Note: No longer on current map. Location approximate and based on available information. 

 

Bahçecik 

September: 105 Greek males from Şile were marched to a Turkish village just outside of Bahçecik where they were to be slaughtered but locals complained. They were taken to a nearby field, unclothed and slaughtered with knives. One male survived. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.344. 

 

Pınarbaşı 

September: Massacre of Greeks.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.25. 

 

Çesme 

September: Greeks who were unable to flee in time on vessels were massacred. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.70. 

 

Yağcılar 

September: Massacre of Greeks. The perpetrators were Turks from the neighboring Turkish villages of Kuskular and Salaptalar. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.71. 

 

Alibey Adasi 

September: Wholesale massacre of Greeks just outside of town. Many men and women executed by gunshot.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.96,100.  

 

Bergama 

September: Massacre of 800 Greeks at Agia Kastriani, Teke-Bugaz, Sayindere, Ay Yianni, Kayiatzikia and Yigma-Tepe.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.140.  

 

Bademli 

September: Over 100 Greeks massacred. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.142. 

 

Çandarli 

September: Massacre of Greeks. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.143. 

 

Kavuklu 

A massacre of Greeks. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.271.  

 

Dikili 

September: Wholesale massacre of Greeks along the shores of Dikili. The massacre was so violent the shoreline was strewn with the blood and bones of the massacred victims. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of the Western Shoreline of Asia Minor. Volume A. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 1980. In Greek. p.145. 

 

Akhisar

September: Wholesale massacre of men, women and children. The women and children were massacred with machine guns in a nearby ravine under the eyes of the local Muslim population who arrived to watch the spectacle from surrounding heights. 

Source: Puaux, René. Les derniers jours de Smyrne. Paris 1923, p.45.  

 

Balikesir Province 

September: Upon the arrival of a division of the Kemalist regular army under the command of Kiarim Bey, the Christians  of Balya Maden and Balikesir were assembled on the 18th of September to be deported to Ankara. Instead they were massacred somewhere between Balya Maden and Karaağaç. Wells and ditches were opened and corpses were thrown in and burned. The victims amounted to several thousand.  

Source: Puaux, René. Les derniers jours de Smyrne. Paris 1923, pp.41-42. 

 

Ezine 

October: A telegram from Çanakkale reported a general massacre of Greeks at Ezine. 

Source: GREEKS SPEEDING UP REMOVAL OF REFUGEES (1922, October 16). Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved October 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45586377 

 

Urum Çiftlik 

November: Massacre of 13 Greeks.  

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.531.  

Note: This is the approximate location based on available information.  

 

Bereketli Maden 

November: 35 men including three 13 year old children were taken to a place near Yelatan and massacred.  Around the same time, 100 carpenters from Bereketli Maden were also massacred in various places further south in the Cilicia region. 

Source: The Exodus: Testimonies from the Regions of Central and Southern Asia Minor. Volume B. Center of Asia Minor Studies, Athens 2004. In Greek. p.268.  

 

1923

Gürümze 

Massacre of 125 Greeks. Residents were ordered to gather outside the town's church where they were ordered to hand over their valuables. They were then locked inside the church which was then torched. Some were slaughtered with a scimitar. Among the dead were 3 priests. 

Source: Kenanides, L. The Settlement of Asia Minor Refugees from Cappadocia in the villages of (Nea) Aravisou, (Nea) Axou and Neos Milotopos in the province of Yiannitsa. In Greek. Thessaloniki 2008, A, pp.152-153. 

 

Unknown location 

Guioz-Keuy 1921 

November: Seven priests from Alacam, Bafra and outlying districts were arrested and after being publicly tortured, were crucified at the market place.  

Source: V. Yeghiayan, British reports on Ethnic Cleansing in Anatolia 1919-1922: The Armenian-Greek Section. Center for Armenian Remembrance (CAR), 2007. p.236. 

 

Read petition in English and Greek

Nosotros, los abajo firmantes, solicitamos que cuando organizaciones griegas, políticos u otros grupos pidan que se reconozca el genocidio sufrido por los griegos nativos que vivían en tierras que pertenecían al Imperio Otomano (actual Turquía) entre los años 1914 y 1923, lo hagan incluyendo a todas las víctimas griegas en el reconocimiento.

Aunque apreciamos las medidas adoptadas por parte de algunos grupos solicitando el reconocimiento hasta la fecha, lo consideramos históricamente incorrecto poner de relieve solo la difícil situación y solicitar el reconocimiento de solo un grupo de los grupos de griegos afectados. Por tanto, exigimos que tales medidas asuman ahora un tono más inclusivo.

Entre los años 1914 y 1923, griegos de muchas regiones de tierras que pertenecían al Imperio Otomano fueron víctimas de genocidio. Esta información ha sido atestiguada por la Asociación Internacional de Estudiosos del Genocidio en el año 2007, por numerosos académicos y estudiosos, y apoyado por una significativa cantidad de documentación histórica, incluyendo informativos, relatos de testigos presenciales, declaraciones realizadas por funcionarios extranjeros que se hallaban presentes, así como por testimonio de personal humanitario y misioneros.

Pedimos que todos los reconocimientos futuros rindan homenaje a todas las víctimas griegas del genocidio, utilizando terminología que no divida a las víctimas griegas basada en agrupaciones regionales.

Pedimos que todos los reconocimientos futuros se refieran a las víctimas griegas como griegos independientemente de su región de origen.

En aras de la claridad y la uniformidad, también pedimos que el genocidio se denomine Genocidio Griego , y argumentamos enérgicamente en contra de dar al genocidio múltiples títulos basados en las distintas regiones afectadas. Una única denominación, utilizada de modo uniforme, es una práctica común al referirse a un genocidio, y se ajusta a otras víctimas como los armenios y los asirios, cuyo genocidio se conoce como un Genocidio Armenio y un Genocidio Asirio respectivamente.

Recordamos a quienes buscan el reconocimiento, que aproximadamente 1.000.000 de griegos perecieron durante el Genocidio Griego y que todas las víctimas formaban parte del mismo grupo étnico-religioso y todas eran blanco por igual, sin distinción de región.

Asimismo, pedimos a los medios de comunicación que miren más allá de las exigencias de reconocimiento regional y denuncien el genocidio prestando especial atención a la inclusión, usando una terminología que no divida a las víctimas y no confunda a la opinión pública.

Firma acqui

In July 2017, the Greek Genocide Resource Center launched a petition to help raise awareness on the exclusion of some Greeks from genocide recognition. The petition can be viewed and signed here. A Spanish translation can be read here.

The petition was aimed at Greek organizations both in Greece and abroad who fail to include all the victims of genocide when calling for recognition.

The media release appears below.


 

Over the past few decades, Greeks have made numerous attempts to recognize the genocide of native Greeks living in Ottoman Turkey between 1914-1923. More often than not, these recognitions have been assigned to a particular region (usually Pontus) and in the process, have excluded other Greeks from recognition and remembrance. A petition has just been created, which hopes to put an end to the act of excluding Greek victims from future genocide recognitions. The petition has already attracted over 500 signatures in 4 days.

Genocide is the ultimate act of exclusion. Subsequently it should be remembered in inclusive ways. While the reasons Greeks choose to seek recognition for one particular region and exclude other Greeks from recognition are complex, the fundamental act of excluding Greek Genocide victims from recognition needs to be addressed.

In 2007, the world's foremost experts on genocide, the International Association of Genocide Scholars officially affirmed the genocide of Greeks in Ottoman Turkey. The AIGS used the term 'Pontian and Anatolian' Greeks when describing the region/s in which Greeks were victims. Notwithstanding the fact that Pontus was a region within Anatolia, the recognition should have been a catalyst for including more Greeks in future recognitions. But it wasn't.

In 2009, the South Australian Lower House condemned only the genocide of Pontian Greeks in a joint recognition (along with Armenians and Syrian Orthodox victims), while in 2010, the Swedish Parliament also only recognized the genocide of Pontian Greeks. It had become obvious that Greeks were ignoring the decisions of genocide scholars and continuing with their policy of exclusion.

While research on the broader genocidal experience of Greeks has expanded, and while the Greek public is becoming more aware of the scope of the genocide, more needs to be done to raise awareness. But the problem of exclusion needs to be tackled. With that in mind, the Greek Genocide Resource Center has launched a petition urging all genocide advocates to sign. The petition makes the following demands:

- all future recognitions, pay respects to all the Greek victims of the genocide, using terminology that does not divide the Greek victims based on region, and

- all future recognitions refer to the Greek victims as 'Greeks' regardless of which region they were from.

For the sake of clarity and uniformity, the petition also asks, that:

- the genocide be referred to as a Greek Genocide, and strongly argues against giving the genocide multiple titles based on regions. A single title, used uniformly, is common practice when referring to a genocide, and is in line with other co-victims such as the Armenians and Assyrians, who refer to their genocide as an Armenian Genocide and Assyrian Genocide respectively.

One of the targets of the petition, is Canadian Senator Leo Housakos. Senator Housakos will soon present a motion to the Canadian Senate seeking to only recognize the genocide of 353,000 Greek victims from Pontus. While the death toll of the Greek Genocide as a whole is approximately 1,000,000 Greeks, it is surprising that a Senator of Greek descent will exclude almost 700,000 Greeks from recognition and memory. Housakos has yet to make a statement regarding the reasons he has excluded so many Greeks from the motion.

Other decision makers of the petition include Pontic organizations in Greece and abroad.

While the path to recognition for Greeks has been largely one of exclusion, it should be noted that there have been some inclusive recognitions. For example in 2013, the New South Wales Legislative Assembly recognized the genocide of all Greek victims, regardless of region. While this recognition was impeccable in its wording, it has been the exception, rather than the norm.

Those who wish to sign the petition can do so here.

---

The press release was published at:

The Assyrian International News Agency
International Center for Transitional Justice
CosmosPhilly

 

Subcategories

The perpetrators of the Greek Genocide were responsible for planning and executing the destruction of Greek communities during the genocide. They include members of the Committee of Union and Progress Party, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk and his nationalist supporters (Kemalists) as well as German military personnel. 

An analysis of some of the regions affected and other documentary evidence.

Quote #2

Winston Churchill (1874-1965) - British Statesman

“... Mustapha Kemal's Army ... celebrated their triumph by the burning of Smyrna to ashes and by a vast massacre of its Christian population...”

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